Tenderloin Crime And Gossip Roundup: Turn Of The Century Edition

While the Tenderloin suffers from its fair share of present-day crime, thefts and assaults in the neighborhood are nothing new.

Here is a selection of crimes and accidents that took place in the Tenderloin neighborhood between 1900 and 1903, all collected from the San Francisco Call newspaper archives.  

Held for Criminal Assault, Jan. 4th 1900

A. S. Williams, petty officer on the Pensacola, was yesterday held to answer before the Superior Court by Judge Mogan in $2500 bonds on a charge of criminal assault. The complaining witness was Mrs. Pauline Kolbe of 615 Jones St. and the alleged assault was committed at her home on November 2 last.

Cut His Throat With a Razor, April 8th 1900

Joseph Cantrowlth, an elderly man, made an attempt last night to end his life by cutting his throat with a razor at his residence, 403 Leavenworth St. The ambulance was summoned and the man was hurried to the City Receiving Hospital, where his wound was dressed. Cantrowlth has been afflicted with asthma for a long time, and has often threatened to commit suicide. His recovery Is doubtful.

Franklin Only Defended Himself, April 20th 1900

The preliminary examination of Blake Franklin, the stalwart young stenographer, charged with an assault to do grievous bodily harm to Miss Louise Parmentler, 309 Jones Street, was held before Judge Cabaniss yesterday afternoon. After the hearing of the evidence the case was dismissed, the evidence going to show that Franklin had only acted in self-defense.

Takes Overdose Of Morphine, Dec. 19th 1900

Mrs. George Bemer, 23 years of age and known in Tenderloin circles as Mabel Mills, took an overdose of morphine at her lodging place on Ellis Street last evening. Her condition is not serious. She came here from Truckee last September.

Found Lying on Sidewalk, March 30th 1902

A man who is believed to be J. Newton, an agent for a life Insurance concern, was found yesterday lying on the sidewalk in front of 216 Leavenworth St. When taken to the Emergency Hospital, his skull was found to be fractured. It is believed he received the injury by falling down.

Officers Seize Abused Horses, June 14th 1902

Three horses belonging to George Howes, who conducts a transfer business from 508 Jones St., were seized and condemned by the officers of The Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To Animals yesterday. It is alleged by Secretary Holbrook that the animals were both ill-fed and abused. 

Says Boom-Mate Robbed Him, Dec. 20th 1902

John C. Krure, 118 Jones St., secured a warrant from Police Judge Conlan yesterday for the arrest of Edward J. Panoch, on the charge of grand larceny. Kruse alleges that he and Panoch shared the same room last Wednesday night, and that while he was asleep, Panoch cut out the pocket of his trousers and stole $9.50. Kruse also says that when he awoke the gas was escaping from the gas jet and Panoch had disappeared.

Disappeared With Her Coin, Jan. 21st 1903

Miss L. S. Johnson, 120 Jones St., reported to the police yesterday that while she was in a restaurant with a young man known sometimes as Daniel B. Howell and sometimes as H.M. Livingston, she gave him her satchel containing $200 to carry. He asked to be excused for a few minutes and disappeared with the satchel. Captain Martin detailed two officers to find him.

Falls From Second Story Window, Jan. 24th 1903

George Heiser, a florist residing at 503 Jones St., fell out the second-story window of that building early this morning and broke his back. He was taken to the Receiving Hospital and will die.

May Be Fatally Injured, June 4th 1903

Daniel Sullivan, a teamster residing at 139 Hyde Street, was yesterday kicked by a horse and sustained injuries from which he may die.

Held on Two Felony Charges, Oct. 3rd 1903

Andrew Metzinger was held to answer before the Superior Court by Police Judge Mogan yesterday on two charges, one of burglary and the other grand larceny. He was accused of entering the room of Miss Nora McNamara, 1046 Folsom Street, on August 15 and stealing her trunk, which was filled with clothes, and of stealing a bicycle belonging to Oliver W. Tuttle, 314 Leavenworth St. on August 1. He put up a defense that he had to steal the articles because his wife was starving, but the Judge told him he did it because he was too lazy to work.

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Tenderloin crime and gossip roundup turn of the century edition