4 dramas to catch in Phoenix theaters right now

Looking to reflect on the humanity of it all? Don't miss this week's lineup of dramas showing on the big screen in and around Phoenix.

Here are the top-ranked drama films to catch in theaters, based on review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes' Tomatometer Score, which reflects the opinions of hundreds of film and television critics.

(Movie descriptions courtesy The Movie Database; showtimes via Fandango. Movie ratings and showtimes are subject to change.)

Gully Boy

A coming-of-age story based on the lives of street rappers in Mumbai.

Boasting a Tomatometer Score of 100 percent and an Audience Score of 87 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, "Gully Boy" has proven to be a critical darling since its release on Feb.14. Variety's Jay Weissberg said, "A mainstream rap musical served up with generous helpings of deftly written hip-hop lyrics and an appealing, largely well-woven narrative starring Ranveer Singh in all his charms," while Deborah Young of the Hollywood Reporter noted, "Zoya Akhtar directs with flair and passion and, aided by explosive performances from a right-on cast, triumphs over the familiarity of the star-is-born storyline."

Catch it on the big screen at AMC Arizona Center 24 (565 N. Third St.) through Monday, March 18. Click here for showtimes and tickets.

Moneyball

The story of Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane's successful attempt to put together a baseball team on a budget, by employing computer-generated analysis to draft his players.

With a Tomatometer Score of 94 percent and an Audience Score of 87 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, "Moneyball" has garnered plenty of praise.

"'Moneyball' is a winner, one of the freshest and smartest sports movies in years," according to Rafer Guzman of Newsday, while the San Diego Reader's David Elliott said, "Brad Pitt is at the top of his own game as Beane. Cocky and often nonchalant, he is gnawed by doubts that he tries to cover by grabbing a snack or pitching a grin."

Interested? It's playing at Harkins Christown 14 (1620 W. Montebello) through Wednesday, March 20. Click here for showtimes and tickets.

Field of Dreams

Ray Kinsella is an Iowa farmer who hears a mysterious voice telling him to turn his cornfield into a baseball diamond. He does, but the voice's directions don't stop — even after the spirits of deceased ballplayers turn up to play.

With a Tomatometer Score of 86 percent and an Audience Score of 86 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, this '80s throwback has proven a solid viewing choice. The Hollywood Reporter's Duane Byrge said, "In Costner, writer-director Robinson has found the perfect player for a personal-stakes game, a guy with a leg-it-out intensity and kidlike enthusiasm. It's Costner's eye-on-the-ball exuberance that carries Dreams past its often mechanical aesthetic ," and the Chicago Tribune's Dave Kehr noted, "The sentimentality, of which there is plenty, is nicely balanced by a humor of ironic pragmatism, as when Ray, having built his baseball field as a monument to human dreams, decides to charge tourists $20 a head to visit it."

It's playing at Harkins Christown 14 (1620 W. Montebello) through Wednesday, March 20. Click here for showtimes and tickets.

Loving Vincent    

The film brings the paintings of Vincent van Gogh to life to tell his remarkable story. Every one of the 65,000 frames of the film is an oil-painting hand-painted by 125 professional oil-painters who travelled from all across the world to the Loving Vincent studios in Poland and Greece to be a part of the production. As remarkable as Vincent’s brilliant paintings are his passionate and ill-fated life and mysterious death.

With a Tomatometer Score of 85 percent and an Audience Score of 86 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, "Loving Vincent" has a strong following. The Seattle Times's Moira MacDonald said, "Loving Vincent' is almost too beautiful for its own good; I found myself, too often, so dazzled by the form that I quite forgot about the content," while J. R. Jones of the Chicago Reader noted, "The roiling landscape scenes betray the redundance of animating images that already sizzle with energy, but the portraiture works beautifully, especially because the actors who supply the characters' voices and visages are first-rate."

Interested? It's playing at FilmBar (815 N. Second St.) through Wednesday, March 20. Click here for showtimes and tickets.


This story was created automatically using local movie data, then reviewed by an editor. Click here for more about what we're doing. Got thoughts? Go here to share your feedback.