Bay Area/ San Francisco/ Real Estate & Development
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Published on June 06, 2024
SF Victorian from 'Full House' Lists for $6.5 Million; Could Come with Handprints from Stars of the ShowSource: Google Street View

The well-known house from the ‘90s sitcom Full House is up for grabs, priced at $6.5 million. The Victorian residence at 1709 Broderick Street, familiar to TV viewers for its brief but memorable cameos at the start of each episode, was put on the market in San Francisco's Lower Pacific Heights. The house, a piece of television nostalgia, was originally crafted by architect Charles Lewis Hinkel back in 1900 and is listed with The Swann Group of Coldwell Banker Realty.


Source: Coldwell / 1709 Broderick St, San Francisco, CA 94115

The property underwent extensive renovations in 2019, spearheaded by architect Richard Landry of Landry Design Group, who found inspiration in the TV show itself. "The fact that the front is so iconic due to 8 years of being flashed on TV screens around the world made it especially fun to be a part of the project," said William Mungall, an architect with Landry Design Group, as per Architectural Digest. The interior remodel aims to reflect the spirit of the Full House set, featuring an open living space and a large kitchen with an island mirroring the show's familiar setting.


Source: Coldwell / 1709 Broderick St, San Francisco, CA 94115

Spanning 3,700 square feet, the home includes four bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms. The primary suite found on the top floor offers a gas fireplace, window alcove, and an en-suite bath, while the children's room boasts playful bird wallpaper, as described on The Swann Group's listing. Modern touches are evident throughout the house, from the custom Calacatta Oro countertops and Viking appliances in the kitchen to the English garden at the home's rear.


Source: Coldwell / 1709 Broderick St, San Francisco, CA 94115

Aside from the Full House fame, the property offers other unique features. Prospective owners can to also secure the handprints of the cast, including Bob Saget and John Stamos, captured in concrete. "They are from an event with the cast. They represent epic memories of America's favorite family that we welcomed into our homes, on a weekly basis on our televisions for decades," Rachel Swann of The Swann Group told Architectural Digest. The house last changed hands in 2020 for $5,350,000, pointing to not just a home, but an investment in a slice of pop culture history.


Source: Coldwell / 1709 Broderick St, San Francisco, CA 94115